Education Programme

NOTE : THIS IS NOT FOR ANY SUBSTITUTE OF ANY TREATMENT.. ONLY AN EDUCATION PURPOSE

+Neck Pain

Anatomy Of The Neck Region

Anatomy of the Neck Region  One of the most flexible regions of the spine is the neck (cervical) region, which consists of vertebrae, seven shock-absorbing discs, muscles, and vertebral ligaments to hold them in place. The uppermost cervical disc connects the top of the spinal column to the base of the skull. The spinal cord, which sends nerve impulses to every part of the body, runs through a canal in the the cervical vertebrae and continues all the way down the spine. The cervical nerves spread down into the arms; because of this, arm pain is sometimes traceable to a problem in the neck. 

Possible Causes Of Neck Pain

Possible Causes Of Neck Pain One of the most common causes of neck pain is poor posture. It's easy to get into bad posture habits without even realizing   it-even an activity as "innocent" as reading in bed can ultimately lead to pain and serious problems.

   The basic rule is simple: keep your neck in a "neutral" position whenever possible. In other words, don't bend or hunch           your neck forward for long periods. Also, try not to sit in one position for a long time. If you must sit for an extended              period, make sure your posture is good: Keep your head in a neutral position, make sure your back is supported, keep            your knees slightly lower than your hips, and rest your arms if possible.

  Your sleeping position is another possible source of neck problems. Does your pillow cause you to sleep with your neck at    an angle, either too high or too low? If so, you may want to invest in a new pillow. Feather pillows are generally preferable to foam; they conform easily to the shape of the neck.

The neutral position rule also holds true for people who spend time working at computer terminals. Again, don't bend your neck forward. Adjust your desk, monitor, and chair to a comfortable height, so that the monitor is at eye level and your knees are slightly lower than your hips. Some people find that a footstool helps in attaining this correct position. Sit close enough to the monitor so that you don't have to bend forward in order to see well. Use the chair's armrests-your arms need support. Wear your eyeglasses if necessary. Consult your physical therapist to find the set-up that is right for you.

You should also follow the neutral position rule when driving a car. Adjust the seat to bring you close enough to the pedals so that you don't have to extend your neck forward.

What To Do When Your Neck Is Hurting

Apply ice or heat. Many physical therapists prefer ice because of its effectiveness in reducing pain and inflammation. (To use ice, fill a plastic bag with crushed ice, place a towel over the affected area, and then apply the ice-filled bag to the area.) Heat also provides relief to some people, but should be used with caution because it can sometimes make an inflamed area worse. Apply heat or ice for 15-20 minutes at a time, and give yourself a 40-minute rest between applications. If you use both heat and ice, make sure to alternate between the two.

+Aqua Therapy

Why Water Exercise?

Pain in your joints may make you want to hold them very still and avoid activity. However, limiting use of your joints will, over time, cause the joints, ligaments and muscles to lose range of motion and weaken. Muscles may also shorten and tighten up, causing you to feel more pain and stiffness and be less able to do the things you want to do.

Regular exercise helps keep joints moving, restores and preserves flexibility and strength, and protects joints against further damage. Exercise can also improve your coordination, endurance and ability to perform daily tasks (such as walking or writing), increase energy and reduce fatigue, and lead to an improved sense of self-esteem and accomplishment.

The soothing warmth and buoyancy of warm water make it a safe, ideal environment for relieving arthritis pain and stiffness and improving the range of movement of joints affected by arthritis. Exercising in a warm-water pool or hot tub is one method of hydrotherapy, or using water to help treat a condition. Immersing in warm water raises your body temperature, causing your blood vessels to dilate and increasing circulation.

Water exercise is a gentle way to exercise joints and muscles. Water supports joints and lessens stress on them to encourage free movement, and may also act as resistance to help build muscle strength. Using a spa adds a third component to the therapy - massage. Jet nozzles release a mixture of warm water and air, massaging your body and helping you relax tight muscles. Talk with your doctor to determine whether water exercise is appropriate for you.

Water Exercise at Home :

If you obtain benefits from water exercise, you may want to consider installing a pool or purchasing a spa (hot tub) for your home. A hot tub provides the warmth, massage and buoyancy needed to both relax and exercise joints and muscles in the convenience of your home. The size and shape of a hot tub will determine the types of exercises you can do in it. Most spas or hot tubs allow for range-of-motion exercises of joints commonly affected by arthritis, such as the knee and hip. Warm water allows muscles to become relaxed, which can then make it easier to perform exercises and daily tasks. Relaxed muscles also can create an overall feeling of comfort.

Using a Pool or Hot Tub Safely :

The use of heat is recommended for many people with arthritis and related conditions, but not all. Your doctor can help you determine if it is appropriate for you. Benefits of heat can include muscle relaxation, decreased pain and stiffness, and greater ease when performing exercises and daily activities.

Warm water is an especially good way to apply heat to joints affected by arthritis. Extremely hot water is not safe and is not necessary to get results; mild heat is just as effective and easier for the body to tolerate. The water temperature should feel soothing and comfortable, not hot. In a pool, water temperatures from 83 to 88 degrees F are usually comfortable for exercise.

If you are just soaking or doing very gentle movements while sitting in a spa, you can usually tolerate slightly higher temperatures. Soaking time will vary depending on the water temperature and your tolerance for heat. New hot tub users should vary the temperature and length of stay until they can determine what is most comfortable. Start slowly, and extend the time in the spa as you feel comfortable. For most people, soaking time should not exceed 10 to 15 minutes at temperatures between 98 and 104 degrees F. Remember, too, that children and elderly people are more prone to become overheated and may need to soak for less time.

Many people with arthritis and related conditions find that pain and stiffness are worse in the morning. Doctors often advise soaking in warm water before beginning your daily activities to help relieve the pain. You may find it just as beneficial to use spas or warm water pools at other times: in the afternoon to help relax muscles and joints after a full day of activities, to loosen muscles before doing exercises, in the evening before bedtime to relax you for a restful sleep. However, too much heat can actually have a stimulating effect on some people. If this is true for you, enjoying the warm water just before bed may not be an ideal time.

Never use a pool or hot tub during or after drinking alcohol or using drugs. These may cause sleepiness, drowsiness or changes in blood pressure. Pregnant women should not enter a hot tub without first consulting their doctor.

Exercising in Your Pool or Spa

When first entering a spa or pool, relax and enjoy the soothing water. When your muscles and joints feel more comfortable and relaxed, slowly begin your exercise routine. Allow enough time after exercising to relax muscles again before getting out of the water.

Exercises can be done while sitting in a hot tub or while sitting or standing in a pool. Consult your doctor or physical therapist to determine which exercises are appropriate for you. The Arthritis Foundation recommends the following guidelines when doing water exercises:

  1. Submerge the body part you are exercising.    
  2. Move the body part slowly and gently.    
  3. Begin and end with easy exercises.    
  4. Move the joint through complete range of motion if    
  5. possible. Do not force movement, but gently stretch.

Do three to eight repetitions as tolerated. Pain that lasts for more than two hours after exercise may indicate overuse. Do fewer repetitions next time. Be aware of the weakening effects of heat when exercising in warm water. Start slowly and don't over do. Check with your doctor or surgeon before doing any of the exercises if you have joint damage or have had joint replacement surgery.

+ INJURIES

Cartilage Problems : What can you do to avoid, or recover from, this all-too-common injury?

Cartilage tears in the knee are ten a penny among sports people. Some of us remain blissfully untroubled by them, while others experience discomfort, pain and even disability. Happily this is one area where science is moving forward briskly.

Knee Pain: Prevention & Treatment deals with the menisci – what are more commonly known as the 'shock absorbing cartilage' in the knee joint. These two crescent-shaped pads of cartilage are present in both knees. The pad on the inner side of the knee is the 'medial meniscus', while the outer one is the 'lateral meniscus'.

Together they act in four different ways to improve knee function:

  1. they spread load across the joint. In standing, this is up to 50% of the    supported load; in flexion (bending at the knee) it increases to 90%
  2. they improve joint congruency or stability
  3. they increase the contact surface area of the main leg bones, helping to spread the weight of the body across a greater area of articular cartilage
  4. they help to circulate synovial (joint) fluid around the knee.

Crucially, the menisci have limited healing potential as their blood supply only reaches the outermost 10% to 30% of each meniscus. Within this region tears may heal. But more centrally-located tears have very little chance of healing.

Patellar Tendinitis: which athletes are most at risk of injury – and why?

Patellar tendinitis is the most common knee disorder found among competitive athletes. Known as 'jumper's knee', it is most likely to affect you if you play high impact sports involving bursts of intense or repeated stress, notably basketball and volleyball (these sports demand twisting on the spot, deep knee bends and sprinting).

However, anyone from the casual jogger to contact sport players may develop the condition – all too often with far-reaching consequences. One study has estimated that more than half of athletes diagnosed with patellar tendinitis were forced to retire from their sporting activity.

Classically patellar tendinitis has been explained as chronic inflammation of the tendon connecting the kneecap (patella) to the main shin bone (tibia), at the point of connection to the kneecap. Recent research has, however, revised our understanding of the condition.

So in Knee Pain: Prevention & Treatment we look in depth at who is most at risk of getting patellar tendinitis – and why. First we identify both the intrinsic (specific to the individual) and extrinsic (environmental) factors.

Self-Diagnosis for Athletes: how to diagnose and fix your own niggling knee injuries

Sporting injuries to the knee can affect people at any stage of their lives. Often the injury is directly related to the activity itself, as in the golfer who experiences a catching pain in the knee during the follow-through phase of the swing, or the tennis enthusiast whose knee gives way after being wrong-footed.

In other cases the cause of the injury may be unclear. Take for example the runner whose knee gradually tightens until it becomes painful during a seemingly innocuous run. There are likely to be many influencing factors relating to this kind of scenario. Footwear, running technique, and stretching (or lack of it) would be a few things to consider.

And non-sporting factors can have a strong bearing on what seems to be a sports injury. A nurse who has had a busy duty may take certain elements of fatigue into her run; a desk-bound office worker may have postural issues that affect good running technique.

In any event, a certain amount of self-assessment is always useful, especially if you want to manage the problem yourself.

PCL Injuries: don't let ignorance of this little-known affliction cause you to suffer unnecessarily

Deep inside the knee joint, two little ligaments provide crucial stability to help our knees cope with the tremendous forces that many sports subject them to. One of these ligaments – the anterior cruciate ligament or ACL – has achieved celebrity status, mainly because of the tendency of sporting celebrities (especially footballers) to injure it.

The second ligament – the posterior cruciate or PCL – is hardly ever in the spotlight, and because it is less commonly injured,

Acute PCL injuries are often overlooked, sometimes because the physician misses them, other times because the affected individual does not realise they might have done some serious damage and so delays seeking treatment.

NB: sportsmen frequently get PCL injuries when NOT in training or competition .

Glucosamine: is there any proof that this popular supplement really works?

Glucosamine is a rare example of an 'alternative' supplement that has gained widespread mainstream credibility among both the general public and medical practitioners.

Either by itself or in combination with chondroitin, glucosamine is used commonly by older people to help relieve pain from arthritic joints, and is also often advocated by therapists for clients recovering from soft-tissue injuries, in the belief that it promotes cartilage repair.

It's not that you should stop taking Glucosamine altogether. More that you need to pay very careful attention to which form of the supplement you're taking, when you're taking it – and why…

ACL Injuries: why are women far more likely than men to suffer – and what can they do about it?

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly damaged ligament of the knee, accounting for up to half of all knee ligament injuries. But among women ACL injury rates are four to eight times higher than for men. In the US alone, 38,000 women a year injure an ACL.

Moreover, it seems that women are not damaging their ACLs through contact injuries, the kinds you would expect when you take part in sport, and especially team sports. Instead, the leading causes are non-contact mechanisms such as landing badly, heavy impacts and rapid decelerations.

In a recent US study which set about developing and testing out a 'prehab' (preventive) training programme to help reduce non-contact ACL injuries. Twenty-eight women were randomly assigned into control and treatment groups. The treatment group took part in two 'prehab' training sessions a week for nine weeks, while the control group did nothing.

Joint Replacement: how injured athletes of any age can get a new lease of life

In the past 20 years there has been an explosion in the number of total joint replacements performed throughout the world.

Hips and knees are the most commonly replaced joints, but shoulders, elbows and ankles can all be done, too.

With increasing confidence, hip and knee replacements are being given to an ever younger population, who are much more likely to outlast the expected life of their replacement joint and who also place demands on the implants that the original designers would not have considered.

So what's the best advice for pursuing a healthy lifestyle if you are facing or have gone through a total joint replacement? Are you going to be better off stopping all exercise, or is it a case of being able to do some kinds of activity but not others?

Patellofemoral Pain: two radical strategies for alleviating this common problem

Patellofemoral pain, which used to be more commonly called 'anterior knee pain', is often associated with the atrophy of the vastusmedialis obliquus (VMO) muscle: part of the quadriceps group located on the inner side of the lower thigh, just above the kneecap.

Numerous studies have shown the importance of developing appropriate levels of VMO strength as part of the successful treatment of knee disorders.

Cycling forms the cornerstone of many early exercise and rehab programmes for people suffering from patellofemoral disorders. With this in mind, a research group based in Texas has been investigating the most effective cycling technique to maximise VMO muscle activation.

+ UNDERSTANDING HUMAN MOTIONS

The human skeleton is quite literally a system of components or levers. A lever can have any shape and each long bone can be visualised as a rigid bar that can transmit and modify force and motion

Kinematics involves terms that permit description of human movement

  1. The type of motion occuring
  2. The location of the movement
  3. The magnitude of the movement
  4. The direction of the motion

Type of motion

  1. Rotatory or angular motion
  2. Translatory or linear motion
  3. Curvilinear motion
  4. General plane of motion

Location of motion

It is from universal three dimensional co-ordinate system used in mathethetics

X-axis-transverse plane
Y-axis-frontal plane
Z-axis-saggital plane

Direction of motion

  1. Flexion
  2. Extension
  3. Abduction
  4. Adduction
  5. Rotations

Quantity of motion

The quality or magnitude of a rotatory motion can be given either in degrees or in radians Centre of gravity

  1. Gravity is the most consistent force encountered by the human body and behaves in a predictable manner
  2. Its point of application is given as cog or centre of gravity or mass of that object or segment
  3. With each arrangement the location of the individual cog will potentially change

Stability and cog

  1. The larger the base of support of an object the greater the stability of that object
  2. The closer the cog is to the base of support the more stable is the object

+ WATER REQUIREMENT

How much water do you need a day?

Water is an important structural component of skin cartilage, tissues and organs. For human beings, every part of the body is dependent on water. Our body comprises about 75% water: the brain has 85%, blood is 90%, muscles are 75%, kidney is 82% and bones are 22% water. The functions of our glands and organs will eventually deteriorate if they are not nourished with good, clean water.       

The average adult loses about 2.5 litres water daily through perspiration, breathing and elimination. Symptoms of the body's deterioration begins to appear when the body loses 5% of its total water volume. In a healthy adult, this is seen as fatigue and general discomfort, whereas for an infant, it can be dehydrating. In an elderly person, a 5% water loss causes the body chemistry to become abnormal, especially if the percentage of electrolytes is overbalanced with sodium.One can usually see symptoms of aging, such as wrinkles, lethargy and even disorientation. Continuous water loss over time will speed up aging as well as increase risks of diseases.

If your body is not sufficiently hydrated, the cells will draw water from your bloodstream, which will make your heart work harder. At the same time, the kidneys cannot purify blood effectively. When this happens, some of the kidney's workload is passed on to the liver and other organs, which may cause them to be severely stressed. Additionally, you may develop a number of minor health conditions such as constipation, dry and itchy skin, acne, nosebleeds, urinary tract infection, coughs, sneezing, sinus pressure, and headaches.   

So, how much water is enough for you? The minimum amount of water you need depends on your body weight. A more accurate calculation, is to drink an ounce of water for every two pounds of body weight.

+ FRUITS AND ITS VALUES, & WHAT NOT TO DO AFTER MEALS

FRUITS AND ITS VALUES

apples

Protects your heart

prevents constipation

Blocks diarrhea

Improves lung capacity

Cushions joints

apricots

Combats cancer

Controls blood pressure

Saves your eyesight

Shields against Alzheimer's

Slows aging process

artichokes

Aids digestion

Lowers cholesterol

Protects your heart

Stabilizes blood sugar

Guards against liver disease

avocados

Battles diabetes

Lowers cholesterol

Helps stops strokes

Controls blood pressure

Smoothes skin

bananas

Protects your heart

Quiets a cough

Strengthens bones

Controls blood pressure

Blocks diarrhea

beans

Prevents constipation

Helps hemorrhoids

Lowers cholesterol

Combats cancer

Stabilizes blood sugar

beets

Controls blood pressure

Combats cancer

Strengthens bones

Protects your heart

Aids weight loss

blueberries

Combats cancer

Protects your heart

Stabilizes blood sugar

Boosts memory

Prevents constipation

broccoli

Strengthens bones

Saves eyesight

Combats cancer

Protects your heart

Controls blood pressure

cabbage

Combats cancer

Prevents constipation

Promotes weight loss

Protects your heart

Helps hemorrhoids

cantaloupe

Saves eyesight

Controls blood pressure

Lowers cholesterol

Combats cancer

Supports immune system

carrots

Saves eyesight

Protects your heart

Prevents constipation

Combats cancer

Promotes weight loss

cauliflower

Protects against Prostate Cancer

Combats Breast Cancer

Strengthens bones

Banishes bruises

Guards against heart disease

cherries

Protects your heart

Combats Cancer

Ends insomnia

Slows aging process

Shields against Alzheimer's

chestnuts

Promotes weight loss

Protects your heart

Lowers cholesterol

Combats Cancer

Controls blood pressure

chili peppers

Aids digestion

Soothes sore throat

Clears sinuses

Combats Cancer

Boosts immune system

figs

Promotes weight loss

Helps stops strokes

Lowers cholesterol

Combats Cancer

Controls blood pressure

fish

Protects your heart

Boosts memory

Protects your heart

Combats Cancer

Supports immune system

flax

Aids digestion

Battles diabetes

Protects your heart

Improves mental health

Boosts immune system

garlic

Lowers cholesterol

Controls blood pressure

Combats cancer

kills bacteria

Fights fungus

grapefruit

Protects against heart attacks

Promotes Weight loss

Helps stops strokes

Combats Prostate Cancer

Lowers cholesterol

grapes

saves eyesight

Conquers kidney stones

Combats cancer

Enhances blood flow

Protects your heart

green tea

Combats cancer

Protects your heart

Helps stops strokes

Promotes Weight loss

Kills bacteria

honey

Heals wounds

Aids digestion

Guards against ulcers

Increases energy

Fights allergies

lemons

Combats cancer

Protects your heart

Controls blood pressure

Smoothes skin

Stops scurvy

limes

Combats cancer

Protects your heart

Controls blood pressure

Smoothes skin

Stops scurvy

mangoes

Combats cancer

Boosts memory

Regulates thyroid

aids digestion

Shields against Alzheimer's

mushrooms

Controls blood pressure

Lowers cholesterol

Kills bacteria

Combats cancer

Strengthens bones

oats

Lowers cholesterol

Combats cancer

Battles diabetes

prevents constipation

Smoothes skin

olive oil

Protects your heart

Promotes Weight loss

Combats cancer

Battles diabetes

Smoothes skin

onions

Reduce risk of heart attack

Combats cancer

Kills bacteria

Lowers cholesterol

Fights fungus

oranges

Supports immune systems

Combats cancer

Protects your heart

Straightens respiration

 
   

peaches

prevents constipation

Combats cancer

Helps stops strokes

aids digestion

Helps hemorrhoids

peanuts

Protects against heart disease

Promotes Weight loss

Combats Prostate Cancer

Lowers cholesterol

Aggravates 

pineapple

Strengthens bones

Relieves colds

Aids digestion

Dissolves warts

Blocks diarrhea

prunes

Slows aging process

prevents constipation

boosts memory

Lowers cholesterol

Protects against heart disease

rice

Protects your heart

Battles diabetes

Conquers kidney stones

Combats cancer

Helps stops strokes

strawberries

Combats cancer

Protects your heart

boosts memory

Calms stress

 
   

sweet potatoes

Saves your eyesight

Lifts mood

Combats cancer

Strengthens bones

 
   

tomatoes

Protects prostate

Combats cancer

Lowers cholesterol

Protects your heart

 
   

walnuts

Lowers cholesterol

Combats cancer

boosts memory

Lifts mood

Protects against heart disease

water

Promotes Weight loss

Combats cancer

Conquers kidney stones

Smoothes skin

 
   

watermelon

Protects prostate

Promotes Weight loss

Lowers cholesterol

Helps stops strokes

Controls blood pressure

wheat germ

Combats Colon Cancer

prevents constipation

Lowers cholesterol

Helps stops strokes

improves digestion

wheat bran

Combats Colon Cancer

prevents constipation

Lowers cholesterol

Helps stops strokes

improves digestion

yogurt

Guards against ulcers

Strengthens bones

Lowers cholesterol

Supports immune systems

Aids digestion

7 dont's after a meal

Don't smoke-Experiment from experts proves that smoking a cigarette after meal is comparable to smoking 10 cigarettes (chances of   cancer is higher).   

  • Don't eat fruits immediately - Immediately eating fruits after meals will cause stomach to be bloated with air. Therefore take fruit 1-2 hr after meal or 1hr before meal.                                         
  • Don't drink tea - Because tea leaves contain a high content of acid.This substance will cause the Protein content in the food we consume to be hardened thus difficult to digest.         
  •  Don't loosen your belt - Loosening the belt after a meal will easily cause the intestine to be twisted &blocked.                                             
  •  Don't bathe - Bathing will cause the increase of blood flow to the hands, legs & body thus the amount of blood around the stomach will therefore decrease.  This will weaken the digestive system in our stomach.                                                                                             
  • Don't walk about - People always say that after a meal walk a hundred steps and you will live till 99. In actual fact this is not true. Walking will cause the digestive system to be unable to absorb the nutrition from the food we intake.                                                                     
  •  Don't sleep immediately - The food we intake will not be able to digest properly. Thus will lead to gastric & infection in our intestine. 

What to Eat to Beat Knee Pain?

Simple diet changes can help chase away knee pain. Learn which foods can help — and hurt — knee health.

Diet and Knee Pain: Go Fish ( only Non- vegetarian )

The omega-3 fatty acids found in fish are natural anti-inflammatories. Calming joint inflammation can often help ease knee soreness, omega-3s are salmon, tuna, sardines, herring, cod, and mackerel, as well as fish oil supplements.

Diet and Knee Pain: Drink Orange Juice

Orange juice is a top-notch source of vitamin C, a nutrient that may guard against knee osteoarthritis.. “Drinking a glass of orange juice provides about 25 percent more vitamin C than eating an orange,” prevent knee pain are green peppers, grapefruit, and strawberries.

Diet and Knee Pain: Eat Spinach and Onions

Spinach (found in green veggies like spinach) can help relieve knee pain caused by osteoarthritis. they can help prevent vision-related diseases.

Don't forget to add some onions to your spinach

Salad as well. Adding onions to salads, sandwiches, stews, and casseroles may help put the brakes on knee pain. Onions are a rich source of quercetin, a flavonoid with strong anti-inflammatory properties, Apples, red grapes, and tea are also good sources of quercetin.

Diet and Knee Pain: Order Indian Food

A helping of curry could do wonders for your knee pain. curcumin, a powerful anti-inflammatory. “Curcumin works similarly to COX-2 inhibitors — drugs that reduce the COX-2 enzyme that causes the pain and swelling of arthritis,” (the flavonoid in onions) worked too, but not to the extent of the curcumin.

Diet and Knee Pain: Use Ginger Generously

The herb ginger traditionally has been used to relieve upset stomach, it also reduces knee pain by decreasing inflammation. knee pain due to osteoarthritis, ginger extract significantly reduced knee pain during standing and walking. Cooking with this spice can increase the flavor of meals while decreasing knee pain.

Diet and Knee Pain: Avoid Refined Carbohydrates

Diets high in refined carbohydrates can increase inflammation, white bread, pasta, and baked goods — taking these foods out of your diet can have an added bonus of helping you drop excess pounds.

+ 1000 Calories Diet chart - SIMPLE FOOD CHART

Vegetarian

Morning
Tea 1 cup with milk 2 tsf and sugar 1 teaspoonful
Breakfast
Skimmed milk - 1 cup or tea prepared out of it. Toast - 1
 
Vegetable soup -1 cup, Thin Dal - 3/4 bowl.
Vegetable Salad - radish, tomato, salad leaves, cucumber, etc. with salt and pepper. Cooked vegetables - pumpkin, French beans, brinjals etc. except potato, peas, sweet patatoes, etc. No srice, jam, murabba, sweets, sweet meats, dry fruit, nuts, soft drinks.
Afternoon
Simple Tea
Dinner
Tomato soup - 1 cup, skimmed milk curd 1/2 bowl cooked vegetables, 2 chapatis, or bread 1 slice, thin dal 3/4 bowl.
Instead of surgar one can use saccharine in any quantity.

Non - Vegetarian

Morning
Tea 1 cup with milk 2 tsf and sugar 1 teaspoonful
Breakfast
Egg-1 half boiled poached or scrumbled in milk, Toast -1
 
Meat soup -1 cup, boiled fish or rast mutton moderate quantity, vegetable salad / radish, tomato, salad leaves, cucumber etc. cooked vegetables, pumpkin, french beans except potato, chapatis -2 or bread slice, No Rice, jam.
Afternoon
Tea as of morning
Dinner
Chicken soup -1 cup chicken reast - moderate quantity, cooked vegetables, bread -1 slice